Is sodium your concern?

(NC)—Sodium. It’s a nutrient found in table salt and many other foods. While we need a certain amount of sodium to help balance fluids and electrolytes in our bodies, too much may lead to high blood pressure – a major risk factor for stroke, heart disease and kidney disease.

Canadian adults consume an average of 3,092 mg of sodium daily, double the daily recommended intake of 1,500 mg. How could this be? Well, experts believe that most of the sodium we consume comes from the prepared and processed foods that we eat. The biggest culprits are canned soups, bottled dressings, bouillon cubes, and condiments such as ketchup, mustard, and pickles.

Health Canada suggests using Canada’s Food Guide and the Nutrition Facts table to help lower your sodium intake. Choose foods from each food group that are lower in sodium, such as fresh mushrooms.
Fresh Mushrooms are Low in Sodium
A 100g serving of fresh Canadian white button mushrooms contain only 4 mg of sodium. In addition, a serving of fresh mushrooms provides 8% of your daily requirement of potassium. Foods high in potassium and low in sodium may reduce the risk of high blood pressure, a risk factor for stroke and heart disease. Also, mushrooms contain Umami, which helps to boost the flavours of your food, meaning less salt is required to taste.

Mushrooms make a difference:- Substitute 1 cup of grilled portabella mushrooms for sausage in pasta. Save 632 mg sodium.

– Substitute ½ cup of white mushrooms for ½ cup of cheddar cheese in your omelette or scrambled eggs. Save 349 mg sodium.

– Try “white buttons and dip” instead of “corn chips and dip.” Save 552 mg sodium.

More nutrition information, plus recipes and useful tips can all be found online at www.mushrooms.ca.

www.newscanada.com

Written by Canadian Home Trends

Canadian Home Trends

Canadian Home Trends magazine gives you a personal tour of the most stunning homes and condos across Canada. You’ll be inspired by a selection of accessible home décor products, trend reports, simple yet stylish DIY projects, and much more. In each issue, you are given the tools to recreate designer spaces you’ve always dreamt of having at home, in-depth renovation and design advice, colour palette and furniture pairings, and Canada’s best places to shop.

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